The Connected Lawyer

Leveraging Technology to Practice Law More Effectively

The Connected Lawyer - Leveraging Technology to Practice Law More Effectively

Creating and Using and Index in Adobe Acrobat

Recently I posted about an article I had published in Chicago Lawyer Magazine about using Adobe Acrobat as part of my legal research workflow. I have received a couple of questions relating to the article relating to which version of Acrobat you need and how to create an index so that the research is searchable.

With respect to the question of what version of Acrobat is needed, that depends largely on what you want to do with the research that you have. If what you are concerned with is reading your research and annotating it any of the paid versions of Adobe Acrobat will work fine. Please note that the free Adobe Reader will not work for this. You must have one of the paid versions. Alternatively, a program such as NitroPDF would work just fine for this as well. In fact, I find Nitro’s commenting and mark-up tools easy to use than Acrobat’s.

However, if you wish to make your research fully searchable by creating an index that spans multiple files or multiple folders, you will need either Acrobat Pro or Pro Extended. These allow you to create a very powerful index. Doing so is actually quite simple. Further, Rick Borstein has already done all of the work of demonstrating how to do this.

In a blog post from a couple of years ago, Rick explains how to create an index in Adobe Acrobat. Although the instructions provided are for Acrobat 8, they also appear to be the same to create an index in Acrobat 9.

Additionally, for those who learn best by watching, Rick has some how-to videos to talk about search options in Acrobat. In particular, he has one that talks about the differences between Find and Search and one that demonstrates how to build a full text index.

As you can see from Rick’s post and demo, creating an index is an easy thing to do. Further, it can certainly aid you when you want to search through your PDFs, whether they relate to legal research or not.

Category: Acrobat, Software
  • Rick Borstein says:

    Thx for the mention, Bryan!

    Adobe Reader users can comment on documents, too, –>IF Extend Features in Adobe Reader.

    Depending on the amount of research you have, you might considering throwing it all into a PDF Portfolio. The case analysis section of my blog has some tips on searching and organizing using a Portfolio.

    July 8, 2009 at 3:11 pm
  • Bryan Sims says:

    Thanks for that clarification Rick.

    July 9, 2009 at 11:15 am

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